Upcoming! Virtual Talk on Cat Behavior

Join us this Tuesday, April 7, 2020 at 6:30 pm (Pacific time) for the second virtual Science Pub from the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry!

From OMSI: Pour a pint (at home!) and follow along as Dr. Kristyn Vitale discusses the purr-suasive science behind cat social cognition, how outdoor cats live socially in colonies, and how to improve communication with your cat in a way that allows it to engage in natural cat behaviors.

How to Tune in?

  • Tuesday April 7, 2020 | 6:30-8:30 pm (Pacific time) | $5 Suggested Donation (https://omsisciencepub.square.site/)
  • Go to OMSI’s main facebook page at 6:15 pm. Found at: https://www.facebook.com/omsi.museum/
  • You DO NOT need to have a Facebook account to watch the live stream
  • If you are unable to join us on Facebook Live, the video will be posted to OMSI’s Facebook Videos the following day.
  • Each event will begin with our 10 question trivia game. Grab a pencil and paper and compete against your family!
  • We will also host Q&A after the lecture. In order to ask a question, all you have to do is comment on Facebook.

Talk Description 

The Science of Cat Social Lives: Improving Cat-Human Relationships with Kristyn Vitale, PhD, Instructor and Researcher in the Human-Animal Interaction Lab at Oregon State University

  • Millions of humans worldwide share their homes with cats. Despite the popularity of companion cats in our homes, relatively little scientific research has been conducted on cat behavior or the human-cat relationship. The lack of research in this field may in part stem from common stereotypes that cats are unsocial or untrainable. Yet, the science that does exist indicates cats have rich and complex social lives with both other cats and humans.
  • In this talk, Dr. Kristyn Vitale of the Oregon State University Human-Animal Interaction Lab will discuss the current science behind cat social cognition. She will explore the behavior of outdoor cats living socially in colonies as well as the socio-cognitive abilities of pet cats including their ability to respond to human behavior or bond with their owners. She will also describe how to improve communication with your cat through training and enrichment opportunities that allow cats to engage in natural behaviors.

If you think cats are antisocial, maybe it’s you, scientists find

New media mention about our cat sociability research!

Washington Post
By Karin Brulliard
January 16, 2019

Dogs may have stolen the Internet from cats, but cat memes endure — and many center on one theme: Cats are aloof jerks.

The primary ambassador of this notion, naturally, is Grumpy Cat. But cats of all sorts, these memes tell us, desire to be left alone with their coffee, or demand darkness, or prefer ankle attacks to head scratches.

Okay, maybe you know cats that fit the bill. But it is not the case that “cats skew toward independency,” in the words of a new study on cat social behavior. In fact, researchers at Oregon State University found, many pet and shelter cats are pretty eager to interact with humans — particularly people who seek out kitty caresses…..

Read the full article online at Washington Post!