Participate in Survey Exploring Cross-Cultural Perception of the Cat-Human Bond!

I am a researcher studying the cat-human bond. Please feel free to participate and share the following survey offered in both English and Japanese. If you are an adult and either a United States or Japanese citizen you are eligible to participate. You do not need to own a cat to participate. See below for links to the English and Japanese versions of the survey!

Link to English Survey

 

Link to Japanese Survey

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Cross-Cultural Comparison of Cat-Human Bond

2017 was an amazing year! Thank you to all the owners and cats who participated in our research and cat training and socialization classes! I am excited for what 2018 will bring! In less than a week I will be leaving to conduct cat behavior research at Kyoto University in Japan for 3 months!

Please follow maueyes on Instagram for plenty of photos and subscribe to maueyes on YouTube for cat videos.

Happy new year everyone!  明けましておめでとうございます!

What We Understand about Cats and What They Understand about Us

New Media Mention: Felicity Muth, Scientific American March 30, 2016
Link to full story 

A big part of cats’ lives are spent around their human owners, yet scientists are just starting to understand what they think of us

 

stoshpetIn my last post I introduced the topic of cat cognition and what we broadly know about how these animals think. In this post I’m going to talk more specifically about what we understand about cats’ interactions with the animal they spend most time with: us….

To read the rest of the article click here! 

What’s Going On in Your Cat’s Head?

New Media Mention: Felicity Muth, Scientific American March 29, 2016
Link to full story 

Cats are often depicted as being less friendly, cooperative and caring than dogs, but what’s really going on in your cat’s head?

Spirit meet cameraUnsurprisingly, scientists use dogs in behavioural experiments a lot more often than cats. There are whole ‘canine cognition’ lab groups and conferences, which has led to a much greater understanding of our canine friends (see for example the blog ‘Dog Spies’). Cats are generally less cooperative and more nervous in social situations, meaning it’s difficult to use them in experiments. However, a recent paper in Animal Cognition by Shreve & Udell at Oregon State University reviewed what we do know about our (sometimes unfriendly) friends regarding how they think. I’m going to divide what we know about cat cognition into two main areas over two posts: firstly, what we know about cat cognition per se and secondly cat cognition that relates to their relationship with humans…..

To read the rest of the article click here!